INTRODUCTION

Mission
 
Unwilling to pay the $80 – $100 for a guitar rack made in China, I searched for a cheap do it yourself answer. The goal was to get parts from a local hardware store and put a guitar rack for multiple guitars together for less than $20. After scouring the internet, the guides I found were less than satisfactory. So I went on a mission to design and make the ultimate multiple guitar PVC guitar rack. Here is is a guide…
 
Problems I Found

  • Missing Part Values
  • Design Flaws (Balance Issues, Far Wall Proximity, Strength Issues)
  • Vague Descriptions
  • Difficult To Follow
  • Lack Of Pictures And Diagrams

My Design

  • Strong
  • Balanced
  • Spacing for acoustic/multiple guitars
  • Close wall proximity (can place against wall)
  • All parts available at major home improvement stores

Why assemble before gluing?
 
Unless you’d prefer your rack to look as wonky/uneven as the eyes of the late Marty Feldman, I’d suggest pre-assembling the rack, marking the pieces with a pen and then gluing everything together.

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Parts

The List

•20 feet of 3/4 inch size PVC pipe. (comes in 10 foot cuts so get 2 of them)
 

 
•PVC cement or fast drying epoxy (I used epoxy)
 

 
•16 pieces x 3-way “ T ” connectors (3/4 inch size)
 

 
•6 pieces x 2-way “ Elbow ” connectors (3/4 inch size)
 

 
•6 pieces x pipe end cap (3/4 inch size)
 

 
•12 feet of pipe insulation (3/4 inch size) (comes in 6 foot cuts so get 2 of them)
 

MEASURE AND CUT

Making the two 10 foot pieces of PVC pipe the measurements to make the rack stand.

Use Extreme Caution
 
Cutting PVC pipe is dangerous. Proceed with extreme caution. If you do not know the proper way to cut PVC pipe with a PVC pipe cutter or miter box and saw, consult a professional. You can also search the internet on different ways to cut PVC pipe.

The Measurements

When finished you should have the following pieces.

•6 pieces x 2 inches long

•2 pieces x 3 inches long

•5 pieces x 4 inches long

•8 pieces x 6 inches long

•4 pieces x 12 inches long

•4 pieces x 15.5 inches long

•1 piece x 32.25 inches long

Diagram of Measured Parts

ASSEMBLY

The Top, Middle, and Bottom.

The Top

Parts that you will need for this section-
 
• 2 pieces x 2 inches long
• 5 pieces x 4 inches long
• 6 pieces x 6 inches long
• 2 pieces x 2-way “ Elbow ” connectors
• 6 pieces x 3-way “ T ” connectors

Layout of parts

Put them together

The Middle

Parts that you will need for this section-
 
• 1 pieces x 32.25 inches long
• 4 pieces x 12 inches long
• 2 pieces x 3-way “ T ” connectors

Layout of parts

Put them together

The Bottom

Parts that you will need for this section-
 
• 4 pieces x 2 inches long
• 2 pieces x 3 inches long
• 2 pieces x 6 inches long
• 4 pieces x 15.5 inches long
• 4 pieces x 2-way “ Elbow ” connectors
• 8 pieces x 3-way “ T ” connectors

Layout of parts

Put them together

Connect them

Put together top, middle, and bottom. It should look like this.

GLUE IT TOGETHER

Mark Each Connection
 
Make the whole stand straight and how you would like it to sit. Take a pen and mark each
connection of a elbow or T connector to a pipe piece. This will insure the straightness of
the finished product.

 
Apply Adhesive
 
Pull each connection of either the elbow or T joint and a pipe section apart one by one
and follow the next steps:

1. Apply epoxy or PVC cement around inner lip of joint.

2. Insert pipe section.

3. Turn pipe section until pen marks line up.

4. Wait till connection dries and do the adhesive steps to the next  connection until you are finished with entire stand. (This is why I recommend fast drying epoxy rather than PVC cement.)